• Framed Cabinets
    Method of construction where a frame, typically ¾” thick, is applied to the box of the cabinet. This type of construction is typical of traditional styling. There are 4 kinds of framed cabinets, Overlay, Full Overlay, Lipped (partial inset) and Inset.
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  • Frameless Cabinets
    Method of construction where the edges of the sides, top and bottom of the cabinet are finished to form the front of the cabinet. This type of construction is typical of contemporary or European styling.

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  • Cabinet Box
    the top, bottom, sides and back of the cabinet. Usually constructed of particle board with a melamine or white interior or Plywood with a maple veneer interior. The components of the box will range from 3/8” thick material to 3/4” thick material, depending on cabinet manufacturer. Top of page
  • Stiles
    The vertical (left and right side) pieces of wood on the face frame of the cabinet or door. Top of page
  • Rails
    The horizontal (top and bottom) pieces of wood on the face frame of the cabinet or door. Top of page
  • Toe Kick
    The area at the bottom of the base cabinet which allows the user’s toes to go when standing up against the cabinet. Typically 3” deep and anywhere from 4” to 4 ½” high Top of page
  • Flush Toe Kick
    A modification in which the bottom rail or the cabinet is extended to the floor, creating a built in look. Top of page
  • Filler
    ¾” thick loose material matching the cabinets that fills in the gaps between cabinets and or cabinets and walls. This is often needed to allow doors and drawers to function and clear obstacles (appliances, door and window trim, etc)
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  • Extended Stile
    Same concept as a Filler, except it is an extension of the cabinet stile, and offers a more custom look. Typically only available from semi-custom and custom manufacturers Top of page
  • Wide Stile
    A modification in which the left or right stile of the cabinet is increased in order to provide clearance or attach a decorative onlay. The overall width of the cabinet is not changed. Top of page
  • Plywood Construction
    Method of cabinet construction using plywood for the cabinet box. Depending on cabinet manufacturer, the interior of the cabinet will be either be Natural Maple Veneer or Maple printed Melamine Top of page
  • Particle Board Construction
    Method of cabinet construction using particle board for the cabinet box. Depending on cabinet manufacturer, the interior of the cabinet will either be a Maple printed Melamine or White Melamine. Top of page
  • NAF Plywood
    A plywood constructed using glues that have No Added Formaldehyde. The use of NAF Plywood reduces the amount of off-gassing that occurs when the cabinets are first removed from their boxes. This is considered a Green Product. Top of page
  • Overlay Door Styles
    A type of Framed Construction where the door and drawer overlap the cabinet opening by ¼”. The result is a larger space between adjacent doors and drawers. Typically a knife, barrel or finial hinge is used on this door, and is visible when the door is closed Top of page
  • Full Overlay Door Styles
    A type of Framed Construction where the door and drawer overlap the cabinet opening by 1”-1 1/4” depending on manufacturer. The result is a smaller space between doors and drawers, usually ½” or less. A concealed hinge is used on this door, and is not visible when the door is closed. Top of page
  • Lipped Door Styles
    Also known as partial inset, a type of Framed Construction where the door and drawer partially sit inside the cabinet openings. The result looks similar to the Overlay style, but the door and drawer do not project as far out. Knife, Barrel and Finial hinges are used and can be seen when the door is closed. Top of page
  • Inset Door Style
    A type of Framed Construction where the door and drawer sit inside of the cabinet opening. There are two Styles of Inset Construction, Square and Beaded. Square inset does not have any detail on the face frame of the cabinet. Beaded inset has a bead routed into the cabinet opening, giving the cabinet more detail. With Inset Construction, both concealed and finial hinges are available. Top of page
  • Raised Panel Door
    A door that has a flat center panel. Depending on the manufacturer, this is either constructed out of ¼” or ½” material. Top of page
  • Recessed Panel Door
    A door that has a flat center panel. Depending on the manufacturer, this is either constructed out of ¼” or ½” material. Top of page
  • Matching Drawer Head
    Constructing the drawer head to match the door profile. Depending on the styling of the door selected, the center panel or rails on the drawer head will not match exactly. Top of page
  • Slab Doors
    Typically used only with Frameless Construction, Slab Doors are sleek and very contemporary. While solid wood doors are available in slab, the common construction method is Veneer over a particle board base. By using a veneer over particle board the door is prevented from expanding and binding against the adjacent doors and drawers. Top of page
  • Dovetail Drawer Box
    Construction method that interlocks the pieces of the drawer together to form a tight bond designed to hold up to the rigors of daily use. Top of page
  • Full Extension Guides
    Drawer Guides that allow the drawer box to be pulled out completely from the cabinet, allowing the user total access to the drawer. Many guides now come with a self closing feature that allows the drawer to pull itself closed once it has been gently pushed. Top of page
  • Soft Close Hardware
    Available for both the door and drawer, a device which helps prevent the doors and drawers from being slammed shut. Using this feature will help protect the integrity of the doors and drawer heads over time by reducing the impact of constant use. Also, this helps reduce the noise of the doors and drawers hitting the face of the cabinets. Top of page
  • Mortis and Tenon Joint
    A construction method by which the rail of the cabinet or door butts into the stile. The seam of a Mortis and Tenon Joint will run vertical between the two pieces of wood. Top of page
  • Miter Joint
    A construction method by which two pieces of wood are cut on and angle and secured together. The seam of a Miter Joint will run diagonally from the outside corner of the joint to the inside corner. Ideal for door styles with a lot of detail. Also the way moldings connect to each other. Top of page
  • End Grain
    The surface of wood that is perpendicular to the direction of the grain. End Grain is often described by taking a handful of straws and squeezing together. End grain is exposed on mortis and tenon joints, and hidden on miter joints.
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  • Edge Grain
    The surface of wood that runs parallel to the direction of the grain. Edge Grain is the exposed sides of the stile and rails in framed construction. Top of page
  • Base Cabinet
    A cabinet on the floor and under the counter top. Standard base cabinets are 34 ½” tall, 24” deep and available in sizes ranging from 9” to 48” wide in 3” increments. Standard with a toe kick and available in many different configurations including 3 and 4 drawer units, full height door units or the standard top drawer lower door unit. Top of page
  • Wall Cabinets
    A cabinet above the counter. Standard wall cabinets are 12” deep (13” on inset cabinets) and available in sizes ranging from 9” to 48” wide in 3” increments, and in standard heights of 30”, 36”, 39” and 42”. Top of page
  • Tall Cabinets
    This includes pantry, linen and oven cabinets. Width and depth can vary by use, but available in 3” increments in width, Depth is usually 12”, 18” and 24”, and standard heights are 84”, 90”, 93” and 96”. Top of page
  • Vanity Cabinets
    Standard bath vanity cabinets are 30” high, 21” deep and available in sizes ranging from 12” to 48” wide in 3” increments. Standard with toe kick and available in many different configurations. Options include Tall vanities that are 34 ½”high and Low vanities that are 28 ½” high. Top of page
  • Nomenclature
    The coding used to identify each cabinet. While these vary between manufacturers, the general rules apply. B = Base, W = Wall, V = Vanity, T = Tall. The 1st two numbers indicate the width of the cabinet in inches, the 2nd two numbers indicate the height, and the 3rd set (if necessary) indicate depth. For example, a W3042 is a 30” wide, 42” high, 12” deep wall cabinet. The 12” depth is implied because that is standard depth for a wall cabinet. A B36 is a 36” wide base cabinet, 34 ½” high and 24” deep. Top of page
  • Cherry
    A wood which varies in color from rich red to reddish brown. It has a uniform grain and smooth texture. Cherry will mellow over time, darkening with exposure to natural light. Rustic Cherry may have mineral streaks, pith marks, knots and burls running through the wood. Top of page
  • Maple
    A wood which varies in color from creamy white to yellow brown. It has a straight grain and smooth texture, with minimal amounts of pith fleck and mineral spots. Maple is often used for painted cabinets. Top of page
  • Birch
    Similar to maple in color, birch has a straighter grain and is a softer wood. Birch is also used for painted cabinets. Top of page
  • Alder
    A wood with a light brown with a yellow or reddish tinge, Alder has a similar grain to cherry. Small knots are common in Alder. Rustic Alder will have larger knots. Top of page
  • Hickory
    A wood which has extreme color variation between white and reddish brown. Dense and hard, Hickory has a coarse texture with a fairly straight grain. Knots, burls, mineral and color streaks are common. Top of page
  • Lyptus
    A hybrid wood created by the combination two varieties of eucalyptus trees. The graining is similar to cherry and the color can range from red to brown. Lyptus is considered a green product because it is highly renewable and grows at a fast rate.
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  • MDF
    Medium Density Fiberboard, a material ideal for use with painted cabinets. Unlike Wood, MDF will not expand and contract as the temperature and humidity levels change. Often used in conjunction with Maple.
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  • Red Oak
    A wood which is white to light brown in color. Red Oak has and open textured grain. Top of page
  • Quarter Sawn White Oak
    A wood which is white to light brown in color, it’s name comes from the way the log in cut. The process of Quarter Sawing exposes the grain in a unique way, adding to its beauty Top of page
  • Pine
    A wood which is light yellow to reddish brown in color, Pine is a soft wood. Due to its natural softness, pine is often only available distressed. Knots are common, and can affect how a stain is absorbed.
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  • Stain
    A finishing process in which the natural grain of the wood is exposed. Stains come in a variety of tones and colors ranging from light to dark. Stock cabinets tend to have fewer stain colors where custom cabinets have more color choices.
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  • Paint
    A solid finishing process which hides all of the grain. Often paints are used on MDF, which provides a better surface to paint while keeping costs down. Top of page
  • Opaque Stain
    A finish process which has the appearance of paint, but the grain of the wood is still visible when viewed up close. The grain is most apparent on the edge and end grains of the cabinets, where the wood soaks up more of the stain.
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  • Glazed Finish
    A secondary process that may be applied to Stain, Paint and Opaque Stain finish. About the consistency of Elmer’s Glue, the glaze is hand wiped on and hand wiped off. Not only does it collect and hang up in the details of the door and cabinet, but it also tints the color of the cabinets a bit. Because of the thick consistency, more of the glaze is left on the cabinet after the excess is wiped away. Top of page
  • Highlight Finish
    A secondary process that may be applied to Stain, Paint and Opaque Stain finish. About the consistency of a Milkshake, it is sprayed on and hand wiped off. Not only does it collect and hang up in the details of the door and cabinet, but it also tints the color of the cabinets a bit. Because of the thin consistency, the highlight only remains in the deepest of details. Top of page
  • Distressed Finish
    A secondary process that may be applied to Stain, Paint and Opaque Stain finish. These finishes add character, age and custom look to the cabinetry. Distressed finishes include but are not limited to wearing, distressing, cracking, worm holes, rasping, and brushing. These options vary from one manufacturer to another, so it is important to see examples of the elements that you like. Top of page
  • Crown Molding
    Matching material to finish off the top of cabinets and help transition the cabinetry to the ceiling. Crown molding is available in many sizes and shapes to compliment the cabinet style. Top of page
  • Fascia Board
    Matching material used in conjunction with Crown molding. The Fascia Board extents the top of the cabinets, and provides a place for the Crown molding to rest. Top of page
  • Light Rail
    Matching material used to finish off the bottom of the wall cabinets, while at the same time shielding your eyes from the under cabinet lights. Top of page
  • Toe Kick Material
    Matching material ¼” thick that is installed in the toe kick area after all of the cabinets are installed. Top of page
  • Toe Board
    Matching Material, typically with a detail on the edge, used on cabinets with flush toe kick, or wainscot panels. Top of page
  • Touch up Kit
    A kit sent with each order that contains a small amount of matching paint or stain and a putty stick to fill any nail holes and minor dings. Top of page
  • Stock Cabinets
    Often called "Builder Grade" cabinets by a manufacturer that offers a limited range of products, door styles, woods and finishes. These are lighter weight, quickly assembled cabinets. By streamlining, they are able to keep their lead times down to a couple of weeks, and their prices tend to be less. Here at KDG, Mid Continent is our Stock Cabinet. Top of page
  • Semi-Custom Cabinets
    A manufacturer that offers a broader range of products, doors styles and finishes. semi-custom cabinets are available in special sizes and non-standard configurations. They are often made of heavier components and get more hand work. Their prices tend to be higher than stock cabinets, and due to the expanded product offering, their lead times are going to be longer. Shiloh, Crystal Keyline and Crystal Encore are our semi-custom Lines. While Crystal has a larger product offering than Shiloh, both offer a great deal of options and value. Top of page
  • Custom Cabinets
    A manufacturer that offers an unlimited range of products. Aside from what they have listed in their catalog, they can produce just about anything. If you can draw it, they can build it. Dutch Made, Crystal and Crystal Quest are our Custom Lines. The quality of their work is impeccable. They take their time, but it shows in their work. Top of page
  • Lead Times
    The time it takes a manufacturer to enter the order, produce the cabinets and ship them. Lead times will vary throughout the year based on each company's volume, as well as holiday schedules.

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